Advanced Care Planning

As we age our needs change. There is no designated time to say “now it is time to consider higher care”. So taking care of some of the big decisions while you are still able is an important task. By delaying some of these conversations it only puts stress on your loved ones when they need to come alongside you and try to help.

As parents grow older, adult children frequently step into the caregiver role, helping manage daily living tasks such as buying groceries, medical appointments and household chores and maintenance.

Which may also escalate to providing support for your physical and cognitive needs. These new responsibilities can be difficult for your adult children and trying to fit the extra responsibilities into their life can create unnecessary stress.

As you continue to discuss what matters to you with your family, it is recommended that you also put your wishes in writing, in addition centralize your documents by putting all your documents, certificates and cards (originals or photocopies) in one location.

Power of Attorney (POA). Is a legal document that appoints a specific person(s) with the authority to assist you with, or handle your legal and financial affairs – There are two kinds of POA’s – A General POA is in effect when you are cognitively capable and can make decisions alongside your designated person. An Enduring POA can be in effect when you are cognitively capable and most importantly it continues if you become cognitively incapable.

Representation Agreement. A representation agreement is a document that a capable adult (at least 19 years old) uses to appoint another adult, called a representative, to help them make, or to make, personal and health care decisions if they cannot make these decisions on their own.

Advanced Care Planning. Helps you have a say about your health care wishes to be followed if you are unable to communicate such wishes directly. Usually confined to dealing with wishes in respect of life sustaining measures. Topics such as Dialysis, End-of-life Care, a feeding tube, Life support with medical intervention.

Medical order for scope and treatment. “MOST” It is a doctor’s order based on advanced care planning conversation which explore your values, goals, and the range of treatments available. Once decisions are made your doctor can record this on the medical order for scope of treatment or ‘MOST’ form. This helps care provider’s honour what is important to you. You will be given a copy so you can communicate your wishes in all settings of care.

Medical Order of Scope of Treatment – Apartments

The Medical Orders of Scope of Treatment (MOST) explores your values, goals and range of treatments available should you become ill.

This helps care providers honor what is important to you. Only your Doctor can complete this document. 

We require it to be completed within 30 days of moving in and it should be reviewed yearly.

At Menno Place we encourage you, your families or the loved ones closest to you to be informed, participate in planning, choose the degree of intervention, and review your choices regarding the management of life-threatening events and final stage of life along with your doctor.

Some additional document you may wish to discuss and complete with your family are a “Power of Attorney,” for your financial responsibility and a “Representative Agreement” for your care needs decisions when you are unable to speak for yourself.

Medical Order of Scope of Treatment (MOST) – Long Term Care

We have a document your Doctor would be happy to discuss with you called the MOST.  This stands for Medical Orders of Scope of Treatment.

It explores your values, goals and the range of treatments available.

It indicates your choice for treatment should you become ill.

The MOST helps care providers honor what is important to you.

Only your doctor can complete this document. 

The MOST is completed within 30 days of move-in and reviewed yearly.

At Menno Place we believe that you and your families should: be informed, participate in planning, choose the degree of intervention, and review your choices regarding the management of life-threatening events and final stage of life with a medical person.

Consider a “Power of Attorney” for financial responsibility. Consider a “Representative Agreement” for care needs decisions.

Emergency Policy – As per the requirement of the Residential Care Regulations, we adhere to a policy whereby, if you develop an unexpected potentially life threatening problem that is unrelated to your diagnosis (e.g. fall with suspected injury/fracture), you will be transferred to Acute Care unless you direct us otherwise. This may disregard any degree of intervention previously signed.

Advanced Directives – MY VOICEis a planning booklet of advanced care plans that are instituted when people are capable adults. It gives healthcare choices that care providers respect when the person comes into their care.

The Ministry of Health Residential Care Regulation mandates that advance directives be in place for each and every resident.

Please contact the Social Worker/your nurse for more information about advanced care plans/MY VOICE.

Moving In – Who to Bring – Long Term Care

The support of family or friends plays an important part in your transition to your new home here at Menno.

The people that need to join you on Move-in day would be those whom you have established to help/make decisions for you, legal and financial, as you or they need to sign the Move-in paperwork.

These people could be your Substitute Decision Maker or those you have designated as your Power of Attorney.

For additional support we encourage family members to join in helping you move in and settle in here at Menno Place.